Category: Snapshot Management

As most Amazon Web Services (AWS) users probably know, one of the most popular features offered on the platform is the ability to take point-in-time snapshots of data stored in Amazon Elastic Block Store. This method, more commonly referred to as an EBS snapshot, makes it easy and efficient to save incremental changes to your data at the block level, and eliminates the need to regularly engage in a full-blown backup of your files. And by ignoring unchanged data, EBS snapshots minimize the amount of time required to create a backup, which also helps save users money.

However, one traditional downside of backing up data with EBS snapshots is the difficulty of searching for and retrieving individual files, which can often be a cumbersome, time-consuming process. This proved to be a major problem for users, especially for those working for an enterprise-level business with vast amounts of data. But thanks to CloudRanger’s new file-level search functionality, retrieving backups of the specific files you need whenever you need them is as easy as using a search engine.

In the following article, we’ll explain how CloudRanger’s new file-level search functionality works. We’ll also explore the benefits of this exciting new tool, and explain how fits into a larger AWS backup/disaster recovery plan.

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We are delighted to release the CloudRanger Public REST API that customers and partners can use to integrate the CloudRanger platform with third-party applications and systems. Customers and managed service providers (MSPs) can use the CloudRanger API to manage customized backup policies and schedule server resources on AWS cloud.

Access to the CloudRanger Public REST API is controlled by your API key generated in the CloudRanger dashboard and token. This will allow you to manage your Amazon EBS, EC2, RDS and Redshift resources and backup policies across multiple AWS regions and accounts with ease.

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In previous blogs, we have explained why properly tagging AWS resources is necessary, and we have explored some of best practices and recommended strategies for applying tags for your AWS cloud environment. Amazon Web Services have now taken this further and provided some great new support features for tagging Amazon EBS Snapshots so you can exercise more control them. You can now tag your Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) Snapshots at the time of creation. You can do this from the Amazon EC2 console or through the CreateSnapshot API. By tagging resources at the time of creation, you can eliminate the need to run custom tagging scripts after resource creation.

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As a company that specializes in simplifying and demystifying Amazon Web Services (AWS), we here at CloudRanger are constantly answering questions about the AWS platform and its various features. And despite the diverse nature of our client base, one question seems to pop up on a regular basis: Where are my Amazon EBS snapshots stored?

As such, we decided to give this frequently-asked question its very own blog post. In the following article, we’ll explain in detail how and where AWS EBS snapshots are stored, and explain why the answer to this question isn’t quite as straightforward as it may seem at first glance. We’ll also explain how using CloudRanger can greatly simplify the EBS snapshot backup process.

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In previous posts, we’ve discussed the importance of Amazon Elastic Block Store snapshots, also known as EBS snapshots. Since these snapshots allow users to easily and efficiently make incremental backups of their data as needed rather than performing a complete backup, they have become one of the more popular features associated with Amazon Web Services (AWS). However, while making incremental backups via EBS snapshots can save your company time and money, there are still a few potential problems that must be overcome. Specifically, for users who are attempting to use EBS snapshots with a Windows server instance, steps must be taken to ensure that files that are in use during the snapshot process are not excluded, which would lead to an incomplete backup.

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