Category: Backup Policy

The Amazon Web Services (AWS) shared responsibility model outlines the differentiation of Security ‘of’ the cloud with AWS and Security ‘in’ the Cloud with the customer. Workloads that are migrated or created in AWS are not implicitly protected with Disaster Recovery (DR) capabilities. 

“Systems, sites, and networks can fail no matter where they are located or who is managing them. Mission-critical service availability and protection of corporate data are essential no matter where services reside.” 

“Cloud services are not based on traditional enterprise architectures and management. IT departments no longer have end-to-end control of the environment.”

    – Gartner report on DR implementation

Enterprises need to be prepared for failures to their cloud infrastructure due to user errors, malicious & insider threat, operational mishaps or site outages. In this blog, we will explain how with Druva CloudRanger you can keep your AWS data safe and easily recoverable from any region-specific or account-specific outage.

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In this guest blog post, W. Curtis Preston (aka “ Mr Backup”) poses the question ‘Do you need to backup EC2 VMs?’. W. Curtis Preston is an expert in backup & recovery systems; a space he has been working in since 1993. He has written three books on the subject, Backup & Recovery, Using SANs and NAS, and Unix Backup & Recovery. As well as being the Chief Technical Architect at Druva, Mr. Preston is also an independent consultant and writer and has spoken at over 300 seminars and conferences around the world.

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As a company that specializes in simplifying and demystifying Amazon Web Services (AWS), we here at CloudRanger are constantly answering questions about the AWS platform and its various features. And despite the diverse nature of our client base, one question seems to pop up on a regular basis: Where are my Amazon EBS snapshots stored?

As such, we decided to give this frequently-asked question its very own blog post. In the following article, we’ll explain in detail how and where AWS EBS snapshots are stored, and explain why the answer to this question isn’t quite as straightforward as it may seem at first glance. We’ll also explain how using CloudRanger can greatly simplify the EBS snapshot backup process.

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Thanks to cloud-based platforms like Amazon Web Services (AWS), backing up your company’s critical data has never been easier. But as we’ve stated in previous blogs, during an actual crisis, backups may prove useless in the absence of a comprehensive disaster recovery (DR) plan. And while there are many factors that must go into crafting the right DR plan to meet your company’s specific needs, the two most important are the recovery time objective (RTO) and the recovery point objective (RPO). In the following article, we’ll break down what these terms mean and how they differ. We’ll also explain why determining the RTO and RPO is so important, and how CloudRanger can help enact an AWS DR plan once it’s been crafted.

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Since they were first introduced in 2008, Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes, specifically EBS snapshots, have become one of the most popular storage methods offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS). Not only are they generally cheaper than traditional Amazon Machine Images (AMIs), but the snapshot’s ability to capture incremental block-level changes also eliminates the need to continuously backup entire volumes. However, another popular EBS attribute is the ability to quickly and easily copy a snapshot to another region, a feature that may prove useful to your business for a variety of reasons. In the following article, we’ll discuss some of those reasons, as well as how third-party vendors like CloudRanger can help simplify the process.

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