We are delighted to announce that our new functionality for Automated Disaster Recovery Testing for AWS Cloud is now available. A new section is now available in the main CloudRanger dashboard, for Disaster Recovery. In this section, you will be able to create an AWS cloud Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP), much in the same way you already do for creating backup policies in our platform but in this case for disaster recovery testing purposes.

With our existing backup system in place, our new Automated Disaster Recovery Testing functionality allows you to test that any Amazon Machine Image (AMI) backups you are taking actually work successfully in practice.

READ MORE

As a company that specializes in simplifying and demystifying Amazon Web Services (AWS), we here at CloudRanger are constantly answering questions about the AWS platform and its various features. And despite the diverse nature of our client base, one question seems to pop up on a regular basis: Where are my Amazon EBS snapshots stored?

As such, we decided to give this frequently-asked question its very own blog post. In the following article, we’ll explain in detail how and where AWS EBS snapshots are stored, and explain why the answer to this question isn’t quite as straightforward as it may seem at first glance. We’ll also explain how using CloudRanger can greatly simplify the EBS snapshot backup process.

READ MORE

In previous posts, we’ve discussed the importance of Amazon Elastic Block Store snapshots, also known as EBS snapshots. Since these snapshots allow users to easily and efficiently make incremental backups of their data as needed rather than performing a complete backup, they have become one of the more popular features associated with Amazon Web Services (AWS). However, while making incremental backups via EBS snapshots can save your company time and money, there are still a few potential problems that must be overcome. Specifically, for users who are attempting to use EBS snapshots with a Windows server instance, steps must be taken to ensure that files that are in use during the snapshot process are not excluded, which would lead to an incomplete backup.

READ MORE

In the following article, we’ll further explore how Amazon Redshift snapshots work, and why they are useful. We’ll also explain how to easily manage and automate these snapshots, and how third-party services such as CloudRanger can further simplify the process.

As we’ve discussed in previous blogs, Amazon Redshift is a fully managed data warehouse service offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS) which allows users to quickly and easily analyze data using common industry tools such as SQL. The service executes these data queries through various computing resources known as nodes which are grouped together to form clusters. In a similar manner to AWS Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and AWS Relational Database Service (RDS), Redshift allows data from these node clusters to be automatically backed up with snapshots.

READ MORE